sunhoundcd

SUN HOUNDSelf-Titled


mousetrap4


The studio can be tough, even for seasoned artists.

Case in point: Lenny Kravitz, who sounds like just another throwback on the radio, but will absolutely blow your mind (or at least blew mine) live. Another good example is Marilyn Manson. I find his studio product to be excellent, yet just a tad sterile. Meanwhile, every time I listen to Last Tour On Earth, I wish I was there, and feel a little like I was.

This is a huge potential pitfall for budding artists who don't make the right choices with their debut, and one which Sun Hound avoids deftly.

Their self titled debut is a fine representation of what you will hear at their live shows. Ballsy, bluesy rock belted out by a woman with a set of pipes.

Jessica Finch has one of the more noteworthy voices in Pittsburgh music. She has a bawdy, powerful style which plays well against the strong percussion of drummer Nicole Pyeritz. She is also a very talented piano player and composer. The songs reflect a level of maturity beyond the ladies actual years, and their time in the trenches thus far.

Of course, a good engineer behind the board helps, and Dana Cannone delivers yet again. In this instance, he poured enough gravy on it to make it a true album, and why not? Studio work should give the consumer something more than a live show in terms of lush sound.

The real charm here is how he did it without taking the band out of their comfort zone. He was able to quietly enhance this already powerful mix of songs while remaining true to their core sound. The mark of a good producer.

What you get here is slick, but not so slick that the band can't back it up live. Too many artists make this mistake, and their shows leave you wanting. I know from experience that is not the case with Sun Hound. And this album did a very good job of presenting that.

- J


buttoneer web1

 

The studio can be tough, even for seasoned artists. Case in point: Lenny Kravitz, who sounds like just another throwback on the radio, but will absolutely blow your mind (or at least blew mine) live. Another good example is Marilyn Manson. I find his studio product to be excellent, yet just a tad sterile. Meanwhile, every time I listen to Last Tour On Earth, I wish I was there, and fell a little like I was.
This is a huge potential pitfall for budding artists who don't make the right choices with their debut, and one which Sunhound avoids deftly.
Their self titled debut is a fine representation of what you will hear at their live shows. Ballsy, bluesy rock belted out by a woman with a set of pipes.
Jessica Finch has one of the more noteworthy voices in Pittsburgh music. She has a bawdy, powerful style which plays well against the strong percussion of drummer Nicole Pyeritz. She is also a very talented piano player and composer. The songs reflect a level of maturity beyond the ladies actual years, and their time in the trenches thus far.
Of course, a good engineer behind the board helps, and Dana Cannone delivers yet again. In this instance, he poured enough gravy on it to make it a true album, and why not? Studio work should give the consumer something more than a live show in terms of lush sound. But the real charm here is how he did it without taking the band out of their comfort zone. What you get here is slick, but not so slick the the band can't back it up live. Too many artists make this mistake, and their shows leave you wanting. I know from experience that Sunhound does not. And this album did a very good job of presenting that. - J
Category: Soundcheck