byronnash

Describe the music of Plan B for those who may be unfamiliar:

Byron:  PLANB is a fusion of rock, funk and soul that uses pop sensibility as a simplistic thread in our music. We strive for high musicality within a simple context. We infuse complexity into our style by being musical, but keep it totally accessible to the listener.

 

Who are some of your influences musically?

Byron:  Early music influences are: Rick James, Prince, MJ, and a lot of Bands like Earth, Wind and Fire, Cameo, etc...

Later when guitar became a part of it, Motley Crue, Randy Rhoads, Maiden, Metallica, Megadeth, a lot of a thrash metal really had a major impact on me wanting to play.

How long have you been playing guitar?

planb2Byron:  I've been playing seriously for about twenty years even though I've had a guitar longer

Your musical style is not common-- have you had any hurdles because it's not easily pigeonholed?

Byron:  Honestly the biggest hurdle was that we didn't have anything recorded yet because we are a little over a year old. I feel like our versatile style is a winning point once people catch us live. But at first, if you had to judge the book by the cover, the audience usually can't figure us out. About two songs in they seem hooked and interested cause one moment it's deep funk, and the next there's some serious shredding. We aren't manic in our approach but usually it takes the crowd a second to figure out what's happening. To us, good music is good music.

Where did you record the EP, and were there any challenges recording the songs?

Byron:  Interestingly that was biggest challenge.

When we were a month old after our first sold out show at James street, May 2015, we recorded a couple songs at Audible Images which was great. However, we were... not ripe. Too young.

It sounded good but didn't "feel" as good as we really were. So we shelved it and worked on our chemistry.
In May of 2016, we started out at Plug N Play studios in Penn Hills. Due to scheduling conflict  it was taking too long and we weren't gonna meet our deadline. So most basic tracking was done there. We ended up taking the tracks to Icehouse Recordings in Lawrenceville amd finishing with Jon Miller.

Challenges were dialing in songs that we played live and thinking more in a "studio" frame of mind. We had to shorten songs, trim the fat, and really dial in the guitar tones. For me, singing is the hardest part.

Do you guys improvise and experiment  on stage?

Byron:  Oh yeah all of the time. That's how we write new music. We go off the crowd. If I see heads bobbing, toes tapping, and people interested we push and feed off of that. That energy is what helps me make songwriting and rhythm choices  for new songs.

Do you prefer playing live or recording? Or maybe you appreciate both processes?

Bybyronnash2ron:  I live for live, we all do. We are all live musicians to the core. All of my guys are session dudes so they are always playing out. My guitarist Evan Thorsen and I spend a lot of time playing at my home studio and recording beats, grooves, riffs and ideas. I love that process-- especially when there no clock and money involved. It allows me to explore tones, and try different things at my leisure, a balance of live and studio.

The EP is self-titled?

Byron:  The EP is called "The Late Bloomer."

I've always had that title in my head. It represents me branching out solo. Trying new things and experiencing success later in life on my own schedule. For the guys, being in this band is different for them too. Some are jazz and gospel guys, who never belonged in a band in the traditional sense.

lol... I was about to ask if it had some significance. You've been in the music biz for a long time. A lot has changed. What kind of challenges do bands face that weren't around when you started?

Byron:  In many ways it's easier, but due to technology and access the work load has increased tremendously. You have to be a manager, publicist, musician, promoter, booking agent, office manager, roadie, tour manager, artist, technician --- at full throttle. On the other hand, it's almost like the more shit you have to work with actually doesn't make it easier, so you have to streamline and focus on what your over all goal is. I still do everything I did back then.

What is the plan for Plan B after this release?

Byron:  Well, we have a new batch of songs that are killer. This time we are gonna pre-produce them a little more detailed, and head right back into studio. We have some videos in the works, and our goal is all out of town shows. We want to hit festivals, and do more opening slots

Our approach is like rappers, keep recording and releasing. We opened for Living Colour in April, sold out our first show, solid following,

I pride myself on work ethic and marketing with promotional materials such as the flyer packages, mini promo videos etc. It's all part of the game these days.

Instagram: @bnastynash
Twitter: @nastynash412

Describe the music of Plan B for those who may be unfamiliar:
PLANB is a fusion of rock, funk and soul that uses pop sensibility as a simplistic thread in our music. We strive for high musicality within a simple context. We infuse complexity into our style by being musical, but keep it totally accessible to the listener.
I'll send you a rough almost done being mixed version of a song.
Who are some of your influences musically?
awesome shot
Here's phot options for article or whatever. Photos by : Stephanie Strasburg The one is one of our two logos. And the tickets I did special packages with a sticker and thank you/media card inside for fans and followers